Post Office tour boosts students’ letter writing skills

Stanford, MT, Retail Associate Sarah Bracha teaches the craft of letter writing to local students.

Stanford, MT, Retail Associate Sarah Bracha teaches the craft of letter writing to local students.

Stanford, MT, Retail Associate Sarah Bracha and Postmaster Kristina Hill became local holiday celebrities this past season with children. To inspire them to hone their letter crafting skills, Bracha and Hill visited the local elementary school and discussed letter writing with the young students and how to address letters. They also took Letters to Santa templates, holiday stickers, and a festive poem to aid students in the letter writing process.

“Both the teachers and students enjoyed it immensely,” said Hill.

Beyond classroom visits, Bracha and Hill gave kindergartners, pre-kindergartners and homeschooled students a tour of the Post Office. They also assisted homeschooled children with their letter writing ability at the Post Office during their visit.

High School Junior Learns Valuable Lesson

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.” “Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.”
“Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

When the U.S. government teacher gave the assignment to the class, Niwot, CO, High School Junior Elan Tell knew where he was going for his research: The U.S. Postal Service.

The assignment was to spend a day shadowing a government worker. The student was then to report back to the class whether the government function should be retained in a changing society and shrinking revenue.

Tell connected with Niwot OIC John Wilson who allowed the student to spend the day with him.

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.”

“Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

Post Office Tour Amazes Young Letter Writers

Anchor Point, AK, Retail Associate Melody Martin takes kids on a tour of the post office for National Card and Letter Writing Month.

Anchor Point, AK, Retail Associate Melody Martin takes kids on a tour of the post office for National Card and Letter Writing Month.

Students from Chapman Elementary School in Anchor Point, AK, toured their local Post Office to learn about mailing letters and how mail moves through the facility for April’s National Card and Letter Writing Month.

Anchor Point Postmaster Rindye Phillips arranged the visitations.

“The tour began with the children purchasing stamps for letters they wrote to their friends or family,” Phillips explained. “They put their letters in the drop box and entered the office to see where the letters went. They were amazed at each stop on the tour.

“At the end of the tour, the teachers were given a bag with coloring pages and stickers for the kids,” she added. “We received ‘thank you’ posters from the children, which we put up on display in the mail room to remind our employees of the importance of teaching and how much fun a post office can be.”

Graceful Envelope

Graceful1

Before her recent retirement, West Burlington, IA, Postmaster Cyndie Reppert sparked an interest in “The Letter Art Club.” The primary focus of the club is geared toward improving student handwriting skills, calligraphy and letter art.

The Mediapolis Savings Bank offered to purchase supplies for the club at the Morning Sun Elementary School, including marker sets, paper, envelopes, and postage. This donation allowed twelve students to attend a nine-week, one hour session every Thursday after school.

The club’s final project was to create an envelope as an entry into “The Graceful Envelope Contest,” an international contest sponsored by the Washington Calligraphers Guild and the National Association of Letter Carriers. The theme this year was “There’s no place like home.” Each student came up with his or her own idea of how to depict the provided theme on an envelope.

The efforts of Postmaster Cyndie Reppert in using her time to promote this initiative lead to the artistic creations depicted here as well as the overall success of the project.

Graceful2

Graceful3

Postage Stamps as Teaching Tools?

Visual learning is a process that involves retaining information by viewing graphic displays of topic material. Seeing images of words, ideas and concepts has proven to be an effective strategy in enhancing the learning process and recalling information with more clarity and consistency. One possible application of this concept involves the use of postage stamps to reinforce long-term knowledge about a subject.

Postage stamps have told America’s story since the Postal Service was created in 1775. Their colorful, visual displays of people, places and events continue to capture the attention of collectors around the world. Given the detail and vibrant pictures on stamps, could they be used as a visual aid to help students learn new material in the classroom? Let’s take a look at some of this year’s stamp releases and find out.

On January 6, the New Mexico Statehood stamp was released. The stamp depicts a landscape in northern New Mexico with a date range of 1912-2012, indicating when the territory was officially accepted as a state into the U.S.

The Birds of Prey stamp issue, released on January 20, depicts a collection of five powerful birds including the Northern Goshawk, Peregrine Falcon, Golden Eagle, Osprey, and the Northern Harrier.

The Civil War was a difficult time in our history, and the Postal Service commemorated two particular events with a stamp release. Both the Battle of New Orleans stamp (April 24-May 1, 1862) and the Battle of Antietam stamp (September 17, 1862) were issued on April 24.

Each series displays not only a visual story on the subject matter, but also provides additional information such as names and dates. Students learning about these subjects could possibly reinforce their long-term recollection of that knowledge by reviewing a related stamp issue.

Do you think stamps could be used to reinforce the learning process in the classroom?

  • Hello, I'm Benny the Blogger: I'm the world's most famous postal employee. My hobbies are snappy quotes, kite flying and publishing. I was born Jan. 17, 1706, but don't call me old.

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