Loveland postmark creates Valentine to remember

picture3

Continuing a 71-year old tradition, the Postal Service and Loveland Chamber of Commerce are teaming up to send cards and letters around the world with a coveted “Loveland” special postmark.  A unique design created by a local artist and selected via a competitive contest is stamped on the outside of all Valentine envelopes and re-mailed from the Sweetheart City.

More than 160,000 cards and letters were handled last year. Cards have come from more than 110 countries and every state in the Union. Since the start of the program in 1947, more than 12 million Valentines have been re-mailed by Loveland. It’s the largest program of its kind in the world.

To have cards and letters re-mailed with the Loveland postmark, properly stamp and address each individual Valentine and put them all in a larger stamped envelope and mail them to:

Postmaster – Attention Valentines
446 E. 29th St.
Loveland, CO 80538

Deadlines for Valentine’s Day delivery:

Destination                   Must be in Loveland by:

International                        Feb. 4

United States                        Feb. 7

Colorado                                Feb. 9

Advertisements

World Post Day

World post day 2015

Traditionally observed every year on October 9, World Post Day was created back in 1969 by the Universal Postal Union as a way to create awareness of the Postal Service, its people, and the impact it has on the lives of citizens around the globe. This Friday, people from around the world will celebrate the day, and postal organizations world-wide will engage in activities and promotions to increase awareness of the Postal Service and the impact it has on the lives of the world’s population.

For individuals who’d like to join in on the fun, mail a special letter or card to a friend of family member, even if it’s just to say hello and let that person know you’re thinking about them. Besides enjoying a surprise message from you, they’ll appreciate the thoughtfulness of the unexpected arrival in the mail, and it might also encourage them to reciprocate.

Mail continues to have a meaningful impact in society, even in a digital age. Besides its tactile and visual appeal, no message creates as much joy, wonder, and intrigue than those lovingly sent and eagerly received in the mail.

To learn more about World Post Day, click here.

Letters to Customers Go Viral

Glendale, AZ, City Carrier Michael Raymer

Glendale, AZ, City Carrier Michael Raymer

“I’m not high-tech. I write letters – I write letters to my mom and to my brothers and sisters,” said Glendale, AZ, City Carrier Michael Raymer.

After 20 years of service to USPS, Raymer is retiring at the end of this month. He wanted to share his deep appreciation for the opportunity to provide customers with dedicated service, so he wrote a letter to each one along his route.

“It has been a privilege and a pleasure to have been your letter carrier for the past thirteen and a half years,” Raymer said in his letter.

One of his customers posted the letter to Reddit, and soon afterwards, Raymer’s kind words went viral.

In his interview with local media, Raymer talked about the one thing he’ll miss the most about his job.

“I’m just going to miss the people – these people are so kind and we all get along. I hope I’ve made a difference and I’ve left an impression on somebody,” said Raymer.

In the sharing of his letter with Reddit, and the many people who have since read it world-wide, customers indirectly had the opportunity to tell Raymer just how much they’ll miss him.

Carrier Puts Centenarian’s Concern At Ease

Salt Lake City, UT, City Carrier Jan Androes.

Salt Lake City, UT, City Carrier Jan Androes.

Rolland Tougas lives alone in an apartment located in Salt Lake City, UT. While the 100-year old Tougas avoids modern communication technology such as telephones and the Internet, he does regularly use one service he’s known all his life – the Postal Service. Tougas maintains regular contact with his Edmonton, Canada family through the mail, but when he didn’t receive a letter from his niece and nephew for a longer than usual time period, he became concerned.

Tougas expressed that concern to Salt Lake City, UT, City Carrier Jan Androes while she was on her route. Androes offered to call his family in Canada and Tougas provided her with the telephone number. Though nobody answered the phone when she called, Androes left a message. Soon thereafter, Tougas’s niece returned the call to let her uncle know she had been out of town for a while and was in good health. Tougas’s niece was so impressed with Androes help that she sent a letter to the Postmaster expressing her gratitude.

“I believe this type of service is over and above, and deserves recognition,” said Tougas’s niece.

Digital Crystal Ball

Digital crystal ball

For many people, checking email is part of the daily ritual of staying in contact with friends and family, conducting business transactions, and checking the latest ads from frequented website vendors. If one postal organization implements a new program, it could also mean checking your email for a glimpse into future.

Currently in the test phase of development, Real Mail Notification is a new program designed to send Postal Service customers an email notification that contains images of items that will arrive in the mail along with a time of delivery. Images will include actual photos of mail covers such as letters and advertising pieces, not contents included in the items. Email notifications can be accessed on any device a customer would normally view emails, and can be archived or printed as an individual would any other email message.

Enhanced visibility is a vital component of future technological innovations as the demand for greater transparency in transactions continues to increase. Online retailers use similar tools to inform customers when they’ve made a purchase and when an item is shipped from the store. The process not only keeps customers up to date on important activity, it might also help identity fraudulent activity.

If a fraudster conducts a transaction with someone else’s web-based account, the real owner will receive an email regarding the transaction, so long as the fraudster hasn’t changed the email address. Similarly, if a postal customer receives an email that an item will arrive in the mailbox at a certain time, but the item isn’t there when checked later that evening after it should have arrived, a person can take action to determine if it was removed by an unauthorized individual.

As virtual and physical worlds continue to move closer together each year, the public reaps the benefits of the merging realms.

Do you think email notification of soon-to-be-delivered mail will be a valuable tool for you?

Special Olympics Letter Writing Campaign

Special Olympics 1

Letter Writing Campaign

In honor of the release of the Special Olympics World Games Forever stamp, the U.S. Postal Service is inviting the American public to write letters of encouragement to Special Olympics USA athletes.

Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Start with a salutation, such as “Dear Athlete” or “Dear Special Olympics athlete.”
  • Express your thanks to them for representing the United States at the World Games.
  • Share a little about yourself: family, hobbies, school, or pets.
  • Talk about your favorite sport or event at the World Games.
  • Still can’t find the words to express your support? Draw a picture instead using the Special Olympics World Games logo!
  • Use your first name only and no addresses please.
  • Please do not include, nor ask for, personal contact information such as names, phone numbers, or e-mail addresses.

Mail your letters to:

Special Olympics USA
c/o National Events
475 L’Enfant Plaza SW, RM 10545
Washington, D.C. 20260

Sending letters and cards through the mail is a meaningful, more joyful way to connect with one another, and a handwritten letter or colorful drawing has a greater impact than an email or text. Show your love and support for athletes competing in the Special Olympics World Games.

“Why Should I Choose Your Team?”

Why should I choose your team

That’s the question a 12-year old boy from Yukon, OK, asked in a series of hand-written letters mailed to each team in the NFL.

In his letters, Cade Pope describes the team preferences of his parents and brother. Undecided on which team he should cheer for, he opted to ask each to describe why he should cheer for them. To his pleasure, Cade received an enthusiastic response.

Carolina Panthers Owner Danny Richardson mailed a hand-written response back to Cade outlining the reasons he should be a Panthers fan. In addition to the personal note, Richardson sent a package that contained a signed replica helmet.

San Francisco 49ers Co-Chairman John York also sent a personal response in an email to Cade.

Before he makes a final decision, the young future lifetime fan will wait a while longer to give other teams an opportunity to respond.

Celebrating World Post Day

World Post Day 2

World Post Day is coming in less than two weeks. Are you ready?

Traditionally observed every year on October 9, World Post Day was created back in 1969 by the Universal Postal Union as a way to create awareness of the Postal Service, its people, and the impact it has on the lives of citizens around the globe.

To celebrate the day, postal organizations around the world will engage in activities and promotions to increase awareness of the Postal Service and the impact it has on the lives of the world’s population.

For individuals who’d like to join in on the fun, what better way to celebrate than to mail a letter or card to a friend of family member? Besides enjoying a special message, they’ll appreciate the thoughtfulness of the unexpected arrival in the mail, and it might also encourage them to reciprocate.

Mail continues to have a meaningful impact in society, even in a digital age. Besides its tactile and visual appeal, no message creates as much joy, wonder, and intrigue than those lovingly sent and eagerly received in the mail.

To learn more about World Post Day, click here.

Letter Privacy Stronger Than E-mail

Letter privacy

Letters provide a close, personal way to communicate with people around they world. Sealed up inside every envelope is an opportunity to receive correspondence in an intimate, tactile way. Nobody, other than the recipient, can touch it without permission or they’ll face pursuit by the Inspection Service. The same benefits don’t apply to e-mail.

A hacker can’t snatch letter mail anonymously out of the digital air, but if they successfully crack the password of an e-mail account, they can have access to everything in it. That includes all sent and received e-mails still stored in the account as well as contact information for everyone in an address book.

Criminals who attempt to steal letter mail will be tracked down by the Inspection Service, the law enforcement arm of the Postal Service, and brought to justice. The Inspection Service is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the United States, and has the necessary resources to carry out its investigations.

An e-mail might have a speed advantage over a letter, but that convenience comes with the price of persistent vigilance.

What are some other advantages of writing a letter over an e-mail?

Hello Kitty Makes Grandmother Giddy

Hello Kitty

When a 5-year old girl moved away from her grandmother in Midvale, UT, to attend a hearing rehabilitation center in Missouri, the separation was bitter sweet. Thanks to determined efforts by postal employees, that little girl was able to communicate with her grandmother in a special way.

Born without hearing, Katrina Jensen received a cochlear implant at the age of 5. When she received a scholarship for the Central Institute for the Deaf, she and her family moved to St. Louis, MO, to attend the school. While the move has improved Katrina’s ability to communicate with others, her time with Kay Jensen, her grandmother, has been limited.

Late last month, Katrina sent her grandmother a letter in a Hello Kitty envelope. Kay’s address was written in yellow ink and was difficult to read, but the Postal Service delivered the special message of greeting, even without postage on the envelope.

Kay was thrilled to receive the letter from her granddaughter, and was grateful to the Postal Service for going the extra mile in making sure the warm message of love from a little girl reached her grandmother’s heart.

  • Hello, I'm Benny the Blogger: I'm the world's most famous postal employee. My hobbies are snappy quotes, kite flying and publishing. I was born Jan. 17, 1706, but don't call me old.

  • Subscribe to Your Postal Blog today and join in on the discussion.

  • Click on the earphones above to listen to the latest edition of Your Postal Podcast.

  • Click on the image above to download the latest edition of the USA Philatelic Catalog

  • Want to take Your Postal Blog with you on the go? Click the QR code below and go mobile.

%d bloggers like this: