High School Junior Learns Valuable Lesson

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.” “Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.”
“Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

When the U.S. government teacher gave the assignment to the class, Niwot, CO, High School Junior Elan Tell knew where he was going for his research: The U.S. Postal Service.

The assignment was to spend a day shadowing a government worker. The student was then to report back to the class whether the government function should be retained in a changing society and shrinking revenue.

Tell connected with Niwot OIC John Wilson who allowed the student to spend the day with him.

“My first surprise was that the Postal Service doesn’t use tax money for operations,” said Tell. “That’s definitely going in my report.”

“Postmaster Wilson was very informative. He showed me the whole operation. Is this part of government necessary? Yes. Definitely,” Tell said.

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Post Office Leads the Way in New Access

Post office leads the way

It’s been 14 years in the making, but a new way for the public to access online networks will soon become available. New Zealand Post is taking the igovt login ID system and making it available for public use, and online users will soon have access to an entirely new way to log in to everyday services.

In 1999, the New Zealand government began developing a way to use a single login ID coupled with identity verification to access its multiple networks. The program, called igovt, became active in 2006 and had a total of 424,000 users by the end of last year. In 2012, the New Zealand government approved expanding the service for public use. The new service, named RealMe, is a joint effort by the Department of Internal Affairs and New Zealand Post. It will allow the public to use a single login ID to access both public and private networks. The RealMe ID is touted as a way to prevent fraud and identity theft by offering verification of a user’s identity for online transactions.

To obtain a new ID, an individual will have to go to one of 150 Post Offices outfitted with special technology. People applying for a free RealMe ID will have a biometric photo of themselves taken for identity verification. After verification, a RealMe ID will be issued that can be used to access online networks that participate in the RealMe program. Renewal of the ID will be necessary every five years.

A business that participates in the program will be charged a recurring fee by NZ Post, though use of the system will be free to the public.

Do you think offering a universal login ID is a profitable service for the Post Office?

The 2012 Combined Federal Campaign

It’s time for the 2012 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) season. This is the only opportunity for charitable organizations to solicit federal employees for donations in the workplace.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the CFC program. Since its inception, the campaign has received more than $7 billion in employee donations to thousands of charities across the world.

Last year, federal employees donated $272.7 million to the many charitable programs participating in the campaign. The deadline to submit contribution forms is December 15, 2012.

Do you think the program should be expanded to include participation by other groups such as state and local government employees?

  • Hello, I'm Benny the Blogger: I'm the world's most famous postal employee. My hobbies are snappy quotes, kite flying and publishing. I was born Jan. 17, 1706, but don't call me old.

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