Elderly woman rescued from injury by worried carrier

Lincoln, NE, Indian Village Station City Carrier Jean Foree

Lincoln, NE, Indian Village Station City Carrier Jean Foree

While Lincoln, NE, Indian Village Station City Carrier Jean Foree was delivering along her route recently, she discovered four day’s worth of mail in a customer’s mailbox. For this particular elderly customer, two days of accumulation was a rare occurrence. The more sizeable volume of mail in the box concerned Foree, so she investigated further.

She approached the home and spotted four editions of the daily newspaper sitting on the porch. The discovery prompted Foree to ring the bell and knock on the front door to check on the customer’s well-being, but there was no response. She followed the perimeter of the house to see if she could view the customer inside, but when she found an unobstructed window, she discovered neither the customer nor anything out of the ordinary.

Foree continued on her route and returned to the station afterward, where she discussed the situation with her supervisors. They recommended she contact the local police and ask them to perform a welfare check. Foree followed their advice and agreed to meet officers at the customer’s home. Once there, officers were able to get the customer to respond to their presence, but the elderly woman was unable to get to the door. With paramedics and firefighters standing by, officers forced entry through the front door, allowing paramedics to retrieve the customer to take her to a hospital for care.

“Jean’s actions are a testament to the great work our carriers do every day,” said Postmaster Kerry Kowalski. “Jean is always watching out for her customers and her persistence and genuine concern for Ms. Rouser on March 12th probably saved Ms. Rouser’s life. We are proud to have Jean as part of our Team!”

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