Foiling Ignition Injuries

Foiling ignition injuries

Advanced technology has helped many people avoid automobile injuries that might have otherwise endured needless harm. From airbags to motion sensors, advances in safety equipment have aided in the reduction of injuries many suffer each year. If another piece of technology was introduced to certain automobiles, it might just be possible to reduce potential injuries even further.

Biometric scanners have existed in one form or another for many years. Such devices have helped access restricted areas and equipment by sampling an individual’s specific characteristics, such as a fingerprint. As popular as they are for security purposes, they might also be used as a way to prevent repetitive motion injuries.

A biometric scanner could help reduce repetitive motion actions for individuals who start and stop their vehicles frequently, such as delivery drivers. Repetitive motions have the potential to cause unnecessary physical injury and expense for both an employee and employer. To avoid the repeated twisting motion of a wrist to engage an engine, and any damage that could develop over time, a fingerprint scanner could be installed in a delivery vehicle to determine the identity of a driver. Once confirmed, the vehicle engine would come to life, permitting a driver to travel to the next destination. The process would be repeated to deactivate the vehicle.

As the cost of advanced technology decreases each year, integrating new safety devices into vehicles becomes an ever increasing opportunity.

Do you think the next generation of USPS vehicles could be designed with a biometric scanner for easy starting?

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4 Comments

  1. Phyllis.L.Isaacs@usps.gov

     /  November 6, 2015

    I don’t think a biometric scanner would be a good idea, because Postal vehicles are driven by a variety of people, not just a single individual. Plus, it sounds expensive and subject to glitches. How about the push button starters now featured in a variety of vehicles (as long as the key fob is within a specified distance)?

  2. Anonymous

     /  November 7, 2015

    DITTO …plus it is something else to go wrong.

  3. safety first

     /  November 7, 2015

    i think they should go with pneumatic transmissions, so if your foot isn’t on the gas the transmission is locked like tractors and golf cards. Then biometric scanners wouldn’t be an issue and neither would roll away run away

  4. angie

     /  November 8, 2015

    the twisting motion of constantly cranking up my llv is the least of my problems! easy open back doors, more windows for better vision and air circulation and a MILLION other things are needed on postal vehicles before money is wasted on such silliness-but who am i kidding? as a rural carrier im lucky mine has wheels and brakes and a fan to blow the gas fumes out the window

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