How Would You Like Your Mail?

How would you like your mail

As the light of dawn peaks over the horizon, Samantha powers up her tablet PC from the comfort of her couch and skims through her latest collection of emails. She sips gingerly on a cup of steaming, fresh roasted coffee when she finds what she’s after.

With eager anticipation, she opens the secured email sent to her from her publisher via the Post Office’s encrypted transmission service. Reading the details of her first commission statement, Samantha allows herself the luxury of a satisfying smile knowing that her hard work has finally paid off.

A digital financial statement delivered through an encrypted email service might seem like a possible Post Office offering in the future. For Swiss Post, however, that future possibility is a new reality.

Swiss Post recently unveiled its latest E-Post Office venture. Merging physical mail with a digital counterpart, customers participating in the new service can still opt to receive their physical mail in the traditional way. They can also choose to access it through a secured online platform or by a secured email delivered directly to their inbox so long as the companies they do business with participate in the E-Post Office program.

Customers who take advantage of the service will have greater flexibility in how they receive their mail. An individual can choose to have her mortgage statement delivered to her physical address and the rest of her monthly bills delivered via encrypted email. Each customer will be provided with 5 gigabytes of online storage capacity via the E-Post Office service – at no charge.

Swiss Post is already working on expansion possibilities for the service, including adding a bill pay feature to give customers access to a one-stop payment center.

What hurdles do you think the US Postal Service would encounter if it attempted to introduce this type of service to its customers?

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1 Comment

  1. grannybunny

     /  March 31, 2015

    The biggest hurdle to USPS’ embarking on digital mail would probably be the huge cost of implementing such a system, especially in light of its current financial crisis. The security — or lack of same — of email is also a problem, with computer systems all over the World being hacked. Electronic mail simply is not as secure — as private — as paper mail. Finally, physical mail has a much greater impact on the recipient — “the mail moment” — that few, if any, emails could ever match.

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