Battle of New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans

The War of 1812, sometimes called “the forgotten conflict,” was a confrontation with Great Britain that brought the United States to the verge of bankruptcy and disunion. With the 2015 issuance of the Battle of New Orleans stamp, the Postal Service concludes its commemoration of the bicentennial of a war that ultimately helped forge the nation’s identity and produced the national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

The subject of this final stamp is Andrew Jackson’s triumphant victory over the British on January 8, 1815, at the Battle of New Orleans. Using mixed media, stamp artist Greg Harlin, a specialist in historical paintings, depicts American troops and artillery repelling British forces from behind a mile-long defensive earthwork known as Jackson’s line.

The Battle of New Orleans was the most decisive victory in the war for the underdog Americans. The British suffered some 2,000 casualties as they were gunned down while trying to breach Jackson’s line. Jackson instantly became a national hero.

The battle was fought two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent, which essentially declared the war a draw, had been signed in Belgium on December 24. But this news had not reached American shores, and the treaty would not be ratified until February 1815. Jackson’s victory, coming as it did in the final weeks of the war and before the peace treaty was ratified, left Americans with the impression they had won the war as a whole-and had defeated the greatest power in the world.

The Battle of New Orleans Forever stamp is now available on usps.com or by clicking here.

Advertisements
Comments are closed.
  • Hello, I'm Benny the Blogger: I'm the world's most famous postal employee. My hobbies are snappy quotes, kite flying and publishing. I was born Jan. 17, 1706, but don't call me old.

  • Subscribe to Your Postal Blog today and join in on the discussion.

  • Click on the earphones above to listen to the latest edition of Your Postal Podcast.

  • Click on the image above to download the latest edition of the USA Philatelic Catalog

  • Want to take Your Postal Blog with you on the go? Click the QR code below and go mobile.

%d bloggers like this: