Instant Delivery

Instant delivery

In the future, instant delivery of an item could take place using technology similar to transporters in science fiction novels. In the meantime, companies both large and small are working hard to make instant delivery of items as close to a reality as possible.

Same day delivery is very much a reality in many cities across the world, and the financial rewards for successful businesses venturing into this realm are enticing enough to prompt expansion into a growing number of locations each year. One particular taxi-hybrid service might also be planning to join the same day delivery bandwagon in the not too distant future.

Uber is a taxi-hybrid app service that connects drivers with those needing a ride. To access the service, an individual signs up at Uber.com, downloads the company application for their cell phone, and taps in his or her request for a ride. The app displays the cost range of the ride, finds the nearest driver, and allows both the driver and rider to keep track of each other’s location via GPS. With it’s easily accessible application service, it isn’t hard to fathom package delivery being far behind.

Uber has many investors, including Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos and Google. The potential of joining with these heavyweights in the technology realm has many implications. Could Uber collaborate with Google to pair Google’s existing self-driving car technology with Uber’s app system? Could both be used to deliver products for Amazon? While Uber is remaining tight-lipped about its future ventures, it’s actions might speak louder than any potential words.

Besides receiving healthy investment capital from major technology players, Uber has actively demonstrated its interest in the delivery business. On July 19, 2013, Uber offered the opportunity for users of its app software to order ice cream in multiple cities across the United States and several internationally. The service required a minimum purchase and was only available until 5 p.m. that day. Still, the promotional opportunity gave users the chance to experience ordering an item from their phone and having it delivered to their location shortly after ordering it.

While it’s unlikely that Uber will throw its hat into the ice cream delivery business, it is more likely to use the experience gained from the promotion to work out kinks in its software as a delivery tool.

Do you think the Postal Service could use similar technology in the future to employ carriers on demand when customers request transport of a local item through their cell phone?

Advertisements
Previous Post
Comments are closed.
%d bloggers like this: