Honoring a World War II hero

Western Area AVP Drew Aliperto and Denver Postmaster Mark Talbott present retired employee and Medal of Honor recipient George Sakato a framed art piece of the new Medal of Honor Forever stamp.

Western Area AVP Drew Aliperto and Denver Postmaster Mark Talbott present retired employee and Medal of Honor recipient George Sakato a framed art piece of the new Medal of Honor Forever stamp.

He first served his nation on the battlefield, recognized with many awards including the Medal of Honor. But after World War II, George Sakato came home and diligently served for 27 years at the Denver Post Office as a clerk.

He is one of 12 surviving recipients featured on the Medal of Honor Forever stamp sheet.

Before his trip to Washington D.C. to unveil the stamp, Sakato stopped by the location of his last duty station, Denver’s Stockyards Station, to meet with postal employees who properly sent him off to the First-Day event.

Area media converged on the station, along with several employees who worked with Sakato, who retired in 1980. Denver Postmaster Mark Talbott gave deserving praise to Sakato, the war hero and faithful employee.

“The fact that he was a decorated war hero never kept him away from working hard,” said Talbott. “Thank you for your service to the United States Postal Service and your nation.”               

“To be part of this stamp dedication is humbling,” said Sakato “I share this honor with all the other brave men and women who sacrificed.”

Advertisements

3 Comments

  1. Grannybunny

     /  November 14, 2013

    What a wonderful story; thank you!

  2. Postal worker

     /  November 15, 2013

    Yes, I enjoyed this story as well. Thanks to you Mr. Sakato.

  3. Jonn

     /  November 20, 2013

    What an awesome guy. I’m glad heros have a chance to go to the postal service to continue their commitment to public service.

  • Hello, I'm Benny the Blogger: I'm the world's most famous postal employee. My hobbies are snappy quotes, kite flying and publishing. I was born Jan. 17, 1706, but don't call me old.

  • Subscribe to Your Postal Blog today and join in on the discussion.

  • Click on the earphones above to listen to the latest edition of Your Postal Podcast.

  • Click on the image above to download the latest edition of the USA Philatelic Catalog

  • Want to take Your Postal Blog with you on the go? Click the QR code below and go mobile.

%d bloggers like this: